Displacement, Violence and Vulnerability: Trafficking among Internally Displaced Persons in Kenya

The existence of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) is usually a sign of, prolonged, often overt conflict within a given society. It can also be an indicator for lack of capacity by the relevant state institutions to address the effects of natural calamities. Many IDP communities, uprooted from their original social milieu, become vulnerable to several negative phenomena that may also include human trafficking. This study examines the link between internal displacement and human trafficking by specifically looking at factors that might increase the vulnerability of IDPs to trafficking. The study develops a model containing several elements (variables) or conditions pertaining to trafficking vulnerability. Key among these conditions is experience of violence during the displacement together with the vicinity to main highways and trading centres. The study concludes that depending on the combinations of these factors and meeting these conditions, the vulnerability of IDPs to trafficking can either increase or decrease. A number of recommendations are made towards the mitigation of vulnerability of IDPs to trafficking. Find the research here.

The research was made possible with support from the Civil Peace Service Programme of the Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH.

Displacement, Violence and Vulnerability: Trafficking among Internally Displaced Persons in Kenya